What Are The 6 Agents Of Physical Weathering?

What’s the difference between physical and chemical weathering?

While physical weathering breaks down a rock’s physical structure, chemical weathering alters a rock’s chemical composition.

Physical weathering works with mechanical forces, such as friction and impact, while chemical weathering takes place at the molecular level with the exchange of ions and cations..

What are the 6 types of physical weathering?

Types of Physical Weathering! Pressure-release fracturing! Abrasion! Freeze-Thaw (frost wedging)!

What are 4 examples of physical weathering?

Examples of Physical Weathering:Rivers. Rivers and moving bodies of water like waves in a lake are responsible for a lot of the physical weathering that takes place. … Ice. … Plant Growth. … Physical Weathering through Chemicals.

What are 3 examples of physical weathering?

These examples illustrate physical weathering:Swiftly moving water. Rapidly moving water can lift, for short periods of time, rocks from the stream bottom. … Ice wedging. Ice wedging causes many rocks to break. … Plant roots. Plant roots can grow in cracks.

What is the physical weathering?

Physical weathering is caused by the effects of changing temperature on rocks, causing the rock to break apart. The process is sometimes assisted by water. … Freeze-thaw occurs when water continually seeps into cracks, freezes and expands, eventually breaking the rock apart.

What is the best example of physical weathering?

Examples of Physical WeatheringWhen water in a river or stream moves quickly, it can lift up rocks from the bottom of that body of water. … Many rock surfaces have small crevices on them. … Ice wedges are a big cause of potholes in roads and streets.More items…

What are 5 types of physical weathering?

Types of Physical Weathering! Pressure-release fracturing! Abrasion! Freeze-Thaw (frost wedging)!

What are examples of physical and chemical weathering?

Physical, or mechanical, weathering happens when rock is broken through the force of another substance on the rock such as ice, running water, wind, or plant growth. Chemical weathering occurs when reactions between rock and another substance dissolve the rock, causing parts of it to fall away.